NEON & insights from my first ESA

This year I was lucky enough to be awarded a NEON-ESA early career scholar award to help fund my first trip to ESA. I’ve been to large ecology conferences before, but I was particularly excited to expand my understanding of NEON (National Science Foundation’s National Ecological Observatory Network), meet some great ecologists and learn some new analytical tools. Still recovering from Jetlag (I had got too steamy New Orleans after 35 hours of travelling from Tasmania).

I was thrust into it at 8 am Sunday morning with a workshop on how to use generalized joint attribute modelling with Jim Clark. The flexibility of this tool and robust way it deals with messy community data makes it something I want to use on the microbiome data I’ve got coming in. For those interested, the vignette is super useful too: https://cran.rproject.org/web/packages/gjam/vignettes/gjamVignette.html.

Immediately following the GJAM workshop, we started a NEON focussed workshop on how to access and use NEON data. I was super impressed with just how integrated NEON is with R and how well documented the data is. I felt like you could get to know a particular location and precisely what data was collected there. From a disease ecology perspective, it is really exciting to have disease/microbiome data matched with extensive environmental data. The opportunities to ask continental-scale questions with fine resolution data are enormous. It was great to continue the discussion at a restaurant t after – NEON people are my type of people! Monday was another NEON-orientated day where we got to see what people have been doing with NEON data. I also got to meet Mike Kaspari which was great – I’ve been admiring his work for years.

The rest of my time at ESA was a haze of presenting my work on puma disease dynamics and going to as many disease ecology talks as possible. Two (and sometimes three) parallel disease ecology sessions were pretty neat. Our NSF puma project also had quite a few people presenting too – it was great to see all of this population genomic/disease ecology work coming together. Overall, it had been a huge week, but one that I hope will lead to exciting future collaborations!

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